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I would like to extend my appreciation and gratitude to the Shawnee Mission Post for allowing me the opportunity to provide more information to my Prairie Village neighbors.

Question 1.) The most controversial issue in Prairie Village the past several years has been the trend of teardown-rebuild projects and their impact on the character of surrounding neighborhoods. What would successful management of this issue look like to you?

Question 2.)
Recently, the governing body considered a resolution that would have affirmed Prairie Village's opposition to discrimination against women. The council will also be considering an ordinance that would grant legal protections to LGBTQ individuals in the city. Do you believe such proposals are within the purview of city government? Are they a valuable use of staff's time? Do you support these protection measures in Prairie Village? Why or why not?

Question 3.)
Property values in Prairie Village have risen sharply the past few years — but the city's property tax rate has stayed the same, as have the rates of several other taxing entities. Should the city be taking any steps to address property tax burden on homeowners? Or should it be investing the additional tax revenue its receiving in city projects?

Question 4.)
What's the top infrastructure need — be it with roads, parks or other facilities — you see for the city today, and how would you go about getting it fulfilled as mayor?

Question 5.)
What makes you the best candidate to lead Prairie Village government the next four year and possibly beyond?

Prairie Village mayoral candidates on the issues: What does successful management of teardown-rebuild trend look like?

JAY SENTER - OCTOBER 15, 2018 11:00 AM

Question 1.) The most controversial issue in Prairie Village the past several years has been the trend of teardown-rebuild projects and their impact on the character of surrounding neighborhoods. What would successful management of this issue look like to you?

Answer 1.)

I want to make it very clear to ALL residents….

I supported ALL Phase 2 guidelines — 100% FOR TEAR DOWN AND REBUILDS.

On October 1st – I made an amended motion to exclude current residents from the massing and greenspace requirements.

The reason I made this motion was to protect YOU, the residents of Prairie Village. The massing requirement will require the current residents to spend more money to invest in their homes. The greenspace requirements could inhibit residents from adding on to their home because they may have added a deck, patio or a pool in your backyard in the past. Phase 2 guidelines may require you to pick from the outdoor living area or an addition to your kitchen. I believe this is unfair and not responsible. I released a video with my thoughts on this.

My opponent and his supporters have continued to say that 83% residents supported Phase 2 guidelines. This is not TRUE. – Council Packet, See page 139 – https://www.pvkansas.com/Home/ShowDocument?id=9598

We had 3 public meetings and an online survey. During this time, we had a total 625 responses. Out of those 625 responses, 83% supported the Phase 2 guidelines. To break this down even more, of those who responded out of the 625, Ward 1 – 29%, Ward 2 – 10%, Ward 3 – 28%, Ward 4 – 10%, Ward 5 – 3%, Ward 6 – 8% and 20% unknown.

625 residents out almost 22,000 does not make 83%. Approximately 2% of the residents supported these guidelines. As your mayor, I will listen to ALL the residents of Prairie Village.

Over the last 6 months of walking door to door, I hear residents say they want the houses to fit in their neighborhoods while maintaining the Charm of Prairie Village. As your mayor I will support the creation of an Architectural Review Board. We need to make sure this board keeps the Prairie Village charm by ensuring homes are built with four-sided construction and quality materials that meet or exceed the standards our residents expect. Phase 2 Guidelines have been based on those adopted in Fairway, and my perception is that this has led to builders building to an ordinance instead of quality design that enhances the neighborhood.

As mayor I believe you should set the example for your residents. Surveys of Council, Planning Commission, and my opponent’s home show that only one house from the Council, and one house from Planning Commission comply with Phase 2 Guidelines. My opponent’s home is the most egregious and began this debate before he bought. There is a reason he bought it, and it was not to spite anyone, he just wanted a house with modern amenities like many new and future residents. I’m not in the pocket of the builders, but I understand why someone who supports our charm would live in a house much larger than the original post WWII homes common in the area.

I would never ask you not to do something, that I wouldn’t do myself.

https://www.facebook.com/SerenaSchermolyforMayor/videos/274448763174462/

What’s important is what matters to you. Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on November 6th – Visit www.serenaschermoly.org for more information.

 

Prairie Village Mayoral candidates on the issues: Are non-discrimination ordinances in the purview of city government?

JAY SENTER - OCTOBER 16, 2018 9:47 AM

Question 2.) Recently, the governing body considered a resolution that would have affirmed Prairie Village's opposition to discrimination against women. The council will also be considering an ordinance that would grant legal protections to LGBTQ individuals in the city. Do you believe such proposals are within the purview of city government? Are they a valuable use of staff's time? Do you support these protection measures in Prairie Village? Why or why not?

Answer 2.)

Every resident deserves the right to live free from discrimination, of any kind. Period. We asked our City Staff to draft such a proposal when Council was not supportive of female-only perspective of the UN CEDAW proposal. Our thought at the time was that this was a resolution supporting protections for women and girls and glaringly left some of our other citizens out. We requested that City Staff develop a fully inclusive resolution that would reflect the views of the Council that we protect the rights of all Prairie Village residents, regardless of sex, race, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, political party or any other class deserving this protection.

We need time for our City staff and City Attorney to completely look at this ordinance.

This proposal needs to be vetted and may require changes to protect the city from litigation and damages resulting from business or residents citing religious protections. The Supreme Court has ruled on these and this NDO puts us in a position to be liable.

I am concerned about Enforcement.

Potentially this proposed ordinance could give false hope of Protection to victims. A gay couple who comes to City Hall to make a claim. How are we going to investigate these claims? Were they not allowed to rent the house because they were gay, or any other potential reason?

What if I’m one of only three employees and I’m fired for being transgendered? That wouldn’t violate this ordinance. This says we support non-discrimination, but we won’t enforce these in ALL cases.

We need to look at the cost. Currently, without any council approval to look at this proposed ordinance we have already spent over $9,000 in attorney fees. This is your money, and the wrong way introduce a NDO. We have a duty to provide notice to all stakeholders, businesses and our residents, and this is appearing to Council while it has never been discussed in committee.

No one, of any class, should be discriminated against. We don’t support that in our village. We need to state our commitment to these values, but we need to be clear on intent and our ability to enforce it. If by protecting some residents, we violate the rights of others, we have not been effective for our residents.

This NDO is both too much and too little to be effective. Every resident deserves human rights, without exception. Without loopholes. Without laborious processes that result in minimal results. We need to demonstrate our commitment to our residents, not pay lip service.

What’s important is what matters to you. Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on November 6. Visit www.serenaschermoly.org for more information.

Prairie Village Mayoral candidates on the issues: Where to direct growing property tax proceeds?

JAY SENTER - OCTOBER 17, 2018 10:30 AM

Question 3.) Property values in Prairie Village have risen sharply the past few years — but the city's property tax rate has stayed the same, as have the rates of several other taxing entities. Should the city be taking any steps to address property tax burden on homeowners? Or should it be investing the additional tax revenue its receiving in city projects?

Answer 3.)

Yes, we need to be taking steps to address the property tax burden on our homeowners. Responsible government funds the projects and programs we need to meet our resident’s expectations. Your money is important, and your City takes this responsibility seriously. When looking at the full budget, the increase in revenue seen from rising property values is modest to the city, but substantial to the homeowner. Because the city only plays a small role in the division of your taxes, we will need to be creative as we explore what this means to our residents.

I have supported deliberative forums to bring together residents with our city staff to work on the previous budgets. As mayor, I will appoint a committee with residents, staff and a council members, to research and report to council innovative ways to ease the property tax burdens on all residents. We are limited in what we can do as a city, but we need to present a solution to our state lawmakers to create the changes we need.

There are many great ideas that could provide relief for the problems some of our residents face. In many cases, the home has been paid off, but the increasing value makes it impossible to forecast next year’s taxes or beyond. Kansas offers a Homestead provision, but because of our property values, few residents meet its thresholds. The County could freeze the property value or the tax rate for long-time residents at lower incomes to allow them to make financial decisions and remain in their homes. A provision could be made to divert the tax liability of our at-risk residents above a certain percentage increase, until the property is sold or transferred. There are many solutions, but we will have to partner with other municipalities and regional governments to affect this change at the state level.

With a commitment to finding solutions for those hardest hit by continued growth, it is also important that we continue to fund the ongoing needs of city. There is a long list of priorities that the Council will deliberate and prioritize and decide whether to fund or not.

Lastly, food for thought – The last Mill levy rate increase was in 2012, this was approved to hire two police officers.

This is not about what I can do. This is what WE can do together.

Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on November 6.www.serenaschermoly.org

Prairie Village Mayoral candidates on the issues: The city’s top infrastructure need

JAY SENTER - OCTOBER 18, 2018 11:30 AM

Question 4.) What's the top infrastructure need — be it with roads, parks or other facilities — you see for the city today, and how would you go about getting it fulfilled as mayor?

Answer 4.)

Our top infrastructure needs are our streets and sidewalks, our pool complex, and the need for a current park plan. My number one priority would be our streets.

Street Operations & Maintenance

  • 2015 – 2,580,422, Actual
  • 2016 – 2,527,572, Actual
  • 2017 – 2,664,375, Budget
  • 2018 – 2,132,470, Budget

This is 40% of Public Works Budget

In Prairie Village as of last May, of our Arterial, Collector and Residential Streets, we have twenty-four percent of our streets rated fair or poor. This is thirty miles of streets that need our attention. Public Works goal of repaving 3.5 miles of streets annually would require eight and half years to resurface just these streets.

Food for thought with public works goal of repaving 3.5 miles of streets annually it will require 32 years to resurface our 112 miles of streets.

Everything costs money and it takes time. To provide good government we must budget funds for projects and programs to meet our resident’s expectations. Over months of walking I have heard time and time again that our pool needs to be modernized. This is where our community comes together at the center of our Village, and we, as our park board, residents, and council need to make this a priority for our residents.

Our park plan is out of date and needs to reflect our recent park acquisitions as well as other changes such as the addition of the new Fire Station at Harmon Park. This new neighbor will have some affect on the Skate Park, the Frisbee Golf Course and any future development. We have the responsibility to ensure that we are doing the most we can with what we have. Without a current park plan, we can’t be strategic in our growth.

Last year when we were looking at hiring a park and recreation director for a cost to the city of $135,000. I contacted Johnson County Parks and Recreation to start the conversation about how we could utilize their services without spending any additional money or reinventing the wheel. I am proud to say that the council approved Johnson County taking over our programming and it has saved us from needing another personnel, and provides better opportunities for our residents to enjoy our parks. This is an example of ways to create more with less. I believe strongly in grants and alternative funding. As a city, we can partner with others to make our tax dollars go further.

If you have followed my voting history or have heard me speak on this issue, I am very passionate about this.

February 6, 2017 it came before council to approve $76,032.50 for replacing the McCrum Park Tennis Courts. After doing research and meeting with tennis professionals, I was told the court didn’t need to be completely replaced, it only needed to be resurfaced and the cost for that would be around $30,000. While researching the cost of resurfacing, I found out that grants were available for these repairs for up to $25,000 if we had applied before we had gone out to bid on this project.

I am supportive of maintaining our public spaces, but it only makes sense to be proactive and search for additional funds that are available to our city. As your mayor I will!

Prairie Village Mayoral candidates on the issues: What makes you the best candidate to lead Prairie Village?

JAY SENTER - OCTOBER 19, 2018 11:00 AM

Question 5.) What makes you the best candidate to lead Prairie Village government the next four year and possibly beyond?

Answer 5.)

I am asking to represent all residents of Prairie Village because we need a mayor we can trust. We need someone who represents our community in a non-partisan, collaborative manner. My professional experience has given me the skills and temperament to lead, listen, get input from all stakeholders and make decisions that lead us forward.

I’m not a lawyer, I’m a mother, who has had to work hard for everything I have gotten in my life. I quit school when I was a senior in high school and I found I couldn’t get into the college I wanted to go to, because my school was not accredited. I worked two jobs until I was able to go to college. The month before I left, I found out I was pregnant with my first daughter. As a young expectant mother, raised by her grandparents, I had three options, adoption, abortion or I was on my own. Well, I took my own path. It wasn’t always easy but, my 26-year-old daughter is more than worth the law degree I sought.

When I was young I was a single struggling mother, I worked hard to pay the bills like many residents of Prairie Village. I understand struggling for the extra few dollars that it cost for school fees, child care, increases in utility bills, rising property taxes. I have been there, but, I didn’t quit, or blame others for the circumstances of life. I had to work hard. When I moved to Prairie Village I found my home. I got involved in my community, to help out where I could.

As Mayor, I would encourage a robust volunteer corps and focused public engagement to explore what’s possible with Property Tax Relief, or Aging in Place, enhancing beautification, working with our schools, and any other opportunity to do more with the resources we already possess. I am committed to environmental issues, finding grants, building our bike and pedestrian paths while protecting our trees, strengthening our Arts programming, from additional concerts, a volunteer orchestra, choir, theater group. There are endless possibilities. We will accomplish much more by bringing our voices and our visions together under a Mayor who listens and has a “pitch in and help” attitude. This is not about me this is about us.

I have a passion for Prairie Village. As your mayor, I would have the right attitude and temperament to be the best candidate to work with other council members and city employees to negotiate positive solutions and to reestablish a harmonious atmosphere for the betterment of our city. I want to be your mayor in order to work hard to maintain the quality of life in Prairie Village. I will not use my position to simply add to my resume so as to create a stepping stone for higher elected office.

Our city is my sole priority.

Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on November 6th. www.serenaschermoly.org

 

The Shawnee Mission Post ask all three candidates the following questions.  Below are my answers.  (July 2018)

Question 1.) A majority of residents say they are concerned about the teardown-rebuild trend and the impact it’s having on neighborhoods. Should the city be taking additional steps to ensure new homes “fit” the neighborhoods where they are built? Should the city being looking at ways to reduce disruption to neighbors from new home construction?

Question 2.) What’s your view of the role of a mayor in a city like Prairie Village? Should the top elected official be setting a bold vision for the city? Primarily minding spending? Focusing on some other priority?

Question 3.) Prairie Village homeowners have seen their appraised home values increase faster than most of the rest of the county the past few years. What’s your view of the city’s property tax rate in the face of these rising home values?

Question 4.) The governing body has considered a number of initiatives in recent years to expand bike and pedestrian trails throughout Prairie Village — but has backed away from some projects after the objection of homeowners. Do you think expansion of bike and pedestrians trails is a priority for the city? If so, what would you do to see such projects become a reality?

Question 5.) If you were elected mayor, what’s the top thing you hope you could say about Prairie Village at the end of your term that you can’t say today?

 

Prairie Village mayoral candidates on the issues: Managing ‘fit’ of new homes into existing PV neighborhoods

Jay Senter - July 16, 2018 9:19 am

Question 1.) A majority of residents say they are concerned about the teardown-rebuild trend and the impact it’s having on neighborhoods. Should the city be taking additional steps to ensure new homes “fit” the neighborhoods where they are built? Should the city being looking at ways to reduce disruption to neighbors from new home construction?

Answer 1.)

Yes, we need to ensure the new homes “fit”.

I am supportive of keeping our Prairie Village charm. As our aging housing is replaced, it is important that new homes maintain the charm of our community. The city currently is in Phase 2 of public participation for residential guidelines. The City Council reduced the building heights and elevations, extended side setbacks, as part of Phase 1 in 2016.

As mayor I will support the creation of an architectural review board. We need to make sure this board keeps the Prairie Village charm by ensuring homes are built with four side construction and quality materials that meet or exceed the standards our residents expect. We need to continue to address drainage to protect surrounding neighbors from runoff water.

In 2018, our current permits in Prairie Village are 27% Roof, 25% Fence, 19% Remodel, 8% Building Additions, 8% New Home/Duplex (6% if your remove Meadowbrook), 5% Demolition, 4% Shed and 4% Decks. I support reducing disruptions in our neighborhoods during construction.

I do not support restricting, changing, or adding an ordinance for residents who may want to work on their own home, fence, deck or remodel. As Mayor I would support limiting work hours for contractors that perform construction services, traffic measures, educating contractors, posted signs with work hours and phone number residents could call to complain.

We also need to look at the entire permitting process from start to final inspection to ensure we are doing everything possible to allow construction to be completed as quickly as possible. I also support a web-based program where residents could check on their progress. This software could streamline the process between public works, building permits, inspectors, and contractors, while keeping the neighborhood residents informed.

We need to clarify our codes and look at the procedure used to go forward. Such process must balance growth along with being a community that attracts new residents while maintaining what makes our city charming in the first place.

Prairie Village is bursting with undeniable potential. It’s going to take careful listening, creative thinking, and the acknowledgement of our shared values and our hopes for the future to ensure that our city maintains its special “Prairie Village Charm” while embracing the new voices joining our neighborhoods.

What’s important is what matters to you. Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on August 7. Please visit www.serenaschermoly.org for more information.

 

Prairie Village mayoral candidates on the issues: What’s the role of the mayor in PV?

Jay Senter - July 17, 2018 9:42 am

Question 2.) What’s your view of the role of a mayor in a city like Prairie Village? Should the top elected official be setting a bold vision for the city? Primarily minding spending? Focusing on some other priority?

Answer 2.)

The role of Prairie Village mayor requires leadership, listening, communicating, and building community engagement. Our amazing city runs like it does because of its employees who are committed to the Prairie Village way.

As your mayor I will work with staff and Council to ensure our residents’ expectations are met. I support Ward Meetings in each ward to facilitate community engagement. After being elected I will meet with each City Committee to hear our volunteer’s goals for the committee and our city. I will engage our Merchant’s Association and the Northeast Johnson County Chamber, and let them know I am supportive, and offer my assistance and leadership to help our businesses grow and succeed.

It is important the Mayor work with Johnson County and neighboring city officials to see how we can ensure we are making services available to our residents.

Absolutely, the Mayor should have a bold vision for our city. Mine is to find ways to engage our residents and to provide them the resources and tools to help shape their community. It isn’t about what the Mayor wants, or what the Council wants, it’s what the residents want that matter. Without the appropriate forums and opportunities to voice their concerns and opinions, residents can feel left out of the decision-making process. With these and other engagements we can make the best decisions for the city going forward.

As a Council Member I am about saving, looking for grants, and being mindful that each dollar is an investment given by our residents. We have many items in our budget, including some long-term plans that we should be looking and applying for grants and other capital support. If you have followed my voting history or have heard me speak on this issue, I am very passionate about this.

As Mayor there are many priorities. Our City Council does a great job at maintaining our fiduciary excellence, but as they arrive at budget decisions, it is essential that we are listening to residents and not our own personal vision for the city. Just a few priorities residents have expressed to me are Keeping the Prairie Village Charm, making sure new construction fits the neighborhoods, bike and pedestrian paths, and street and sidewalk maintenance.

My priority will always be what is important to you, is what matters to me. Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on August 7 – Visit serenaschermoly.org

 

Prairie Village mayoral candidates on the issues: Rising home values and city property taxes

Jay Senter - July 18, 2018 9:15 am

Question 3.) Prairie Village homeowners have seen their appraised home values increase faster than most of the rest of the county the past few years. What’s your view of the city’s property tax rate in the face of these rising home values?

Answer 3.)

The rapid rise of appraised home values has shocked many residents but is the result of several positive factors coming together. The value of our housing stock is increasing. Prairie Village continues to rank among the highest rated communities in the state for public safety, quality of life, and our schools are nationally recognized.
The City of Prairie Village current mill levy rate is 19.311. In March, Lisa Santa Maria, Finance Director, projected a 4.5% increase in revenue to the general fund in 2019, amounting to $908,053. She explained about 80% of this additional money comes from increased assessed property values.

Compounding the increase in property taxes was the State Legislature’s failure to pass a bill at end of session that would conform Kansas tax code to the new Federal tax code passed in 2018. This will result in many Prairie Village residents not being able to deduct their property taxes, mortgage interest, or medical expenses on their 2018 Kansas Tax filing.

Residents hear all too often that the Mil Levy was not increased or was decreased, but our residents do not pay their property taxes with mils. They pay in real dollars. The city must be disciplined to control cost, and not view the $900 thousand as a windfall that can be used to grow city government. Instead, we must explore avenues to protect residents from skyrocketing property taxes.

One approach may be establishing a percentage cap on annual property tax revenue growth that would protect residents from excessive increases. Another approach may include providing a percentage tax discount for our seniors who have lived in their homes for an extended, defined period. I’m sure there are other ideas the community may have, and I will listen and present these to the appropriate bodies.

Bottom line, as Prairie Village continues to realize tear down / rebuilds, increased property assessment values for the whole community will be realized. The city must be responsible in ensuring additional revenue is used in part to lower taxes for our residents, and as Mayor I will work with City Council, the County, and our legislators to ensure we are tackling this problem that is squeezing our residents.

What’s important is What Matters to You. If you have any comments, questions or concerns please give me a call (913) 777-9597, Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on August 7 serenaschermoly.org

 

Prairie Village mayoral candidates on the issues: Improving bike- and walkability

Jay Senter - July 19, 2018 10:30 am

Question 4.) The governing body has considered a number of initiatives in recent years to expand bike and pedestrian trails throughout Prairie Village — but has backed away from some projects after the objection of homeowners. Do you think expansion of bike and pedestrians trails is a priority for the city? If so, what would you do to see such projects become a reality?

Answer 4.)

I firmly agree with our residents that the expansion of bike and pedestrian trails is a priority for the city. Over 65% of the respondents to the city’s recent survey rated this important or very important. On May 7, the Council voted to approve the Master Plan for Bike and Pedestrian Path Expansion. I voted against this because of the concerns many residents had brought about its implementation. The proposed removal of many of our older trees and the widening or additions of sidewalks on the right-of-way shocked some surprised residents. We approved the concept of a plan, but the details were far from forth-coming. Public Works has provided the basic framework for where paths are intended, but not the specifics. I was not comfortable approving a concept without a plan. We still need to make the decisions and allocate funds for whatever we choose to implement.

Johnson County’s Bike Path Plan intends to link the county parks and greenspaces to provide extensive corridors for travel and recreation beyond our city limits. By linking to current paths and working with neighbors and residents to find the best routes for widened lanes and sidewalks, we can develop a trail system that will be safely used by the community. Connecting trails in Johnson County to Meadowbrook and to the Corinth and Village Shops opens avenues to activities and supports a broader outdoor living community.

I am committed to making this project a reality. Last month I made a motion that was approved, to allocate $75,000 in the 2019 budget to start the signage and marking process. There are questions about the routes and installation, but these can easily be addressed by engaging the residents involved. The benefits of a well-planned and well-designed bike and pedestrian network will be felt by everyone. Families, seniors, singles and children will be able to easily access schools, events, businesses, community buildings, and each other as they benefit from exercise and being outdoors. Working closely with our residents near these proposed paths is the key to developing a plan we can be proud of.

What’s important is what matters to you. Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor on August 7. Please visit serenaschermoly.org for more information.

 

Prairie Village mayoral candidates on the issues: Top goal while mayor

Jay Senter - July 20, 2018 11:30 am

Question 5.) If you were elected mayor, what’s the top thing you hope you could say about Prairie Village at the end of your term that you can’t say today?

Answer 5.)

At the end of my first term, we can expect to see a more engaged and responsive city. Our Village does a great job of meeting the expectations of the residents as it relates to public works, public safety and infrastructure maintenance. Our council has always provided excellent financial management and solid governance.

I will have appointed a committee to assist with aging in place. The committee will have identified the needs of those residents and explored the ways we can offer assistance to our seniors, allowing them to stay in their homes, and offering a connection outside of their home. That volunteer committee will be working with other committees and the Volunteer Corps to implement these solutions.

I will challenge each one of you to think of ways that we can work together to make our Village a better place to live. There are so many ways to engage our residents in improving our community; from cleaning and maintaining our statuary, planting trees, helping residents with home maintenance, or getting to a doctor appointment, grocery story or a community gathering.

As a city, we can encourage “Clean Up Saturdays” each month when we focus on our common areas and neighbors who need extra assistance. We need volunteers for our events, ad hoc committees, additional qualified people to sit on new committees, mentors for the Teen Council and so many others. We are the Prairie Village Charm. The way we love our community and show that, is what makes us a desirable place to live.

It will be an honor to serve you and I will end my term by making sure that it is easier to be a part of public service. Whether on a committee or as a volunteer, or just an engaged resident, we can expect greater economic development, better parks, more events, bike and pedestrian routes to be proud of, the lowering of code violations and most importantly, Keeping the Charm as a result of residents being more engaged in their city, and city government.

As I end this final question of the week, I would like to extend my appreciation and gratitude to the Shawnee Mission Post for allowing me this opportunity to provide more information to my Prairie Village neighbors.

I want to hear from you, I want to know what matters to you. Please vote for Serena Schermoly for Mayor, August 7. To learn more visit serenaschermoly.org

 


Paid for by Committee to Elect Serena Schermoly for Mayor, Treasurer Shelly Trewolla

5105 West 72nd Street
Prairie Village, KS  66208
(913) 777-9597
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